FLSA/Wages

State Minimum Wage Increases for 2017 (Map)

Minimum wage increases will affect numerous states across the country in January 2017.

Under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), the current federal minimum wage is $7.25 per hour, but the FLSA does not supersede any state or local laws that are more favorable to employees. Therefore, if a state has a minimum wage that is higher than the federal minimum, employers subject to the state minimum wage law are obligated to pay the higher rate to employees working in that state.

The map below shows the states that are increasing their minimum wages, including the new rate and amount of the increase. We also provide a listing of the states increasing their minimum wages and the effective dates of the changes below the map.

State minimum wage changes effective December 31, 2016

New York:

  • $9.70 per hour for Greater New York
  • $10.00 per hour for Nassau, Suffolk, and Westchester counties
  • $10.50 for New York City (small employers)
  • $11.00 for New York City (large employers)

State minimum wage changes effective January 1, 2017

Alaska: $9.80 per hour.

Arizona: $10.00 per hour. The minimum wage is also scheduled to increase to $10.50 per hour on January 1, 2018.

Arkansas: $8.50 per hour.

California: $10.00 for employers with 25 or fewer employees; $10.50 for employers with 26 or more employees. The minimum wage is also scheduled to increase to $11.00 per hour on January 1, 2018.

Colorado: $9.30 per hour. The minimum wage is also scheduled to increase to $10.20 per hour on January 1, 2018.

Connecticut: $10.10 per hour.

Florida: $8.10 per hour.

Hawaii: $9.25 per hour. The minimum wage is also scheduled to increase to $10.10 per hour on January 1, 2018.

Maine: $9.00 per hour. The minimum wage is also scheduled to increase to $10.00 per hour on January 1, 2018.

Massachusetts: $11.00 per hour.

Michigan: $8.90 per hour. The minimum wage is also scheduled to increase to $9.25 on January 1, 2018.

Missouri: $7.70 per hour.

Montana: $8.15 per hour.

New Jersey: $8.44 per hour.

Ohio: $8.15 per hour (gross receipts of $297,000 or more); $7.25 per hour (gross receipts under $297,000)

South Dakota: $8.65 per hour.

Vermont: $10.00 per hour. The minimum wage is also scheduled to increase to $10.50 per hour on January 1, 2018.

Washington: $11.00 per hour. The minimum wage is also scheduled to increase to $11.50 per hour on January 1, 2018.

State minimum wage changes effective July 1, 2017

Washington D.C: $12.50 per hour on July 1, 2017. The minimum wage is also scheduled to increase to $13.25 per hour on July 1, 2018.

Maryland: $9.25 per hour on July 1, 2017. The minimum wage is also scheduled to increase to $10.10 per hour on July 1, 2018.

Oregon: $10.25 per hour standard rate on July 1, 2017; the Portland metro rate will increase to $11.25 per hour; and the nonurban counties rate will increase to $10.00. The minimum wage is also scheduled to increase to $10.75 per hour standard rate on July 1, 2018; the Portland metro rate will increase to $12.00 per hour; and the nonurban counties rate will increase to $10.50.

Minimum wage basics

The federal FLSA requires that a minimum wage be paid for all hours an employee is “suffered or permitted” to work and that an overtime wage be paid for all hours “worked” over 40 in a week. The FLSA does not specifically define “hours worked” or place a limit on the number of hours an employee may work; it requires only that overtime be paid for any hours worked over 40.

Generally speaking, work time includes all time that employees spend engaged in the principal activities that they are employed to perform. Hours worked can also include waiting time; travel time, other than time spent commuting to and from the employee’s regular place of work; breaks or meal periods that are less than 20 minutes long; and time the employee is required to spend in training, at seminars, or in meetings.

Hours worked for purposes of the FLSA does not include time spent on call, time spent waiting to work, or time when an employee is required to carry a pager or cell phone, provided the employee is otherwise free to effectively use the time for his or her own personal purposes. The FLSA does not obligate employers to pay employees for holidays, vacation, or sick days.

Under the de minimis rule, employers may disregard insubstantial or insignificant periods of time beyond the scheduled working hours, if, as a practical administrative matter, such time cannot be precisely recorded. If employees are checking e-mails for 2 or 3 minutes, employers will likely not have to pay for this time. But if employees are spending 10 to 15 minutes after work hours, employers will have to pay employees for this work time.

The rules are strict, but the penalties are stricter. Paying employees properly now will help you to avoid expensive fines, claims, and lawsuits down the line.

What state minimum wage changes have already taken place in 2016? See our previous minimum wage map.

Susan PrinceSusan E. Prince, J.D., M.S.L., is a Legal Editor for BLR’s human resources and employment law publications. Ms. Prince has over 15 years of experience as an attorney and writer in the field of human resources and has published numerous articles on a variety of human resources and employment topics, including compensation, benefits, workers’ compensation, discrimination, work/life issues, termination, and military leave. Ms. Prince also served as an expert on several audio conferences discussing the 2004 changes to the federal regulations under the Fair Labor Standards Act. Before starting her career in publishing, Ms. Prince practiced law for several years in the insurance industry and served as president of a retail sales business. Ms. Prince received her law degree from Vermont Law School.

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Questions? Comments? Contact Susan at sprince@blr.com for more information on this topic

  • cynthia knight

    You forgot to add Oregon
    High density counties: The portions of Multnomah, Clackamas, and Washington counties located inside Portland’s Urban Growth Boundary.

    July 1, 2016 – June 30, 2017

    $9.75

    July 1, 2017 – June 30, 2018

    $11.25

    July 1, 2018 – June 30, 2019

    $12.00

    July 1, 2019 – June 30, 2020

    $12.50

    July 1, 2020 – June 30, 2021

    $13.25

    July 1, 2021 – June 30, 2022

    $14.00

    July 1, 2022 – June 30, 2023

    $14.75

    Medium density counties: Benton; Clatsop; Columbia; Deschutes; Hood River; Jackson; Josephine; Lane; Lincoln; Linn; Marion; Polk; Tillamook; Wasco; Yamhill, and the portions of Multnomah, Clackamas, and Washington counties located outside of Portland’s Urban Growth Boundary.

    July 1, 2016 – June 30, 2017

    $9.75

    July 1, 2017 – June 30, 2018

    $10.25

    July 1, 2018 – June 30, 2019

    $10.75

    July 1, 2019 – June 30, 2020

    $11.25

    July 1, 2020 – June 30, 2021

    $12.00

    July 1, 2021 – June 30, 2022

    $12.75

    July 1, 2022 – June 30, 2023

    $13.50

    Low density counties: Baker; Coos; Crook; Curry; Douglas; Gilliam; Grant; Harney; Jefferson; Klamath; Lake; Malheur; Morrow; Sherman; Umatilla; Union; Wallowa; Wheeler.

    July 1, 2016 – June 30, 2017

    $9.50

    July 1, 2017 – June 30, 2018

    $10.00

    July 1, 2018 – June 30, 2019

    $10.50

    July 1, 2019 – June 30, 2020

    $11.00

    July 1, 2020 – June 30, 2021

    $11.50

    July 1, 2021 – June 30, 2022

    $12.00

    July 1, 2022 – June 30, 2023

    $12.50

    • Melissa Blazejak

      Thank you for bringing this to our attention, Cynthia! We’ve updated the article and the map to reflect the changes in the Oregon Minimum Wage rate.

    • R Work

      I can no long afford to eat out. These increases will price people out of a job, not a wise move for the law makers.
      Another reason I voted for Donald Trump

  • Shanell George

    I currently live in Elizabeth City, NC and not once has there been a change in minimum wage in years. This state is becoming more and more expensive to live here, job are working their employees double the work and paying nothing. I’m from NY and they pay their employees, but this state I holding back and more and more people are losing homes, car’s and other things that they have worked so hard for. It’ time for NC to go up on minimum wage, other states are increasing, why not here.

  • If one individual is a stockholder in numerous corporations having separate and distinct Employers Identification Numbers and the combined total of the numerous corporations exceed the 25 employees as a total, are the separate corporation required to pay the minimum of $10.50 per hour (a California entity), because of the “common owner” rule?