Category: Employment Law

trends

2018 Compliance Trends That HR Professionals Should Know

HR had a tumultuous year when it came to compliance and regulations. Under a new administration, regulations were rolled back—but not necessarily the ones we expected. Deadlines were changed, employers were confused, and health care gave everyone a headache.

Print
breastfeeding

Court Provides New Guidance on What to Expect When You’re Expecting (or Breastfeeding)

Many parents—including this one—will admit that one of the first things they did after learning they were expecting was purchase the latest “fad” book or read the newest blog on pregnancy and parenting. Just as parenting guidance continues to evolve, so too does guidance from the court on issues relating to pregnancy and breastfeeding in […]

Print
I-9

How to Avoid Common Form I-9 Violations

Fines for knowingly hiring or continuing to employ unauthorized workers can reach as much as $16,000 per violation, while substantive and uncorrected technical violations can be as much as $1,100 per violation. Here are 4 important areas employers need to understand in order to avoid common Form I-9 violations.

Print
Immigration

Temporary Protected Status for El Salvador, Haiti to cease in 2019

On January 8, Secretary of Homeland Security Kirstjen Nielsen announced that temporary protected status (TPS) for El Salvador will cease. The termination date will be delayed for 18 months, until September 9, 2019. Approximately 260,000 individuals are currently registered with the program.

Print
Employers

How the NLRB’s Recent Decisions Can Affect All Employers

Decisions by the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) are often thought of in the context of unions, but the NLRB’s decisions can affect all employers because of the federal law it enforces. Recently, the NLRB issued several decisions that reversed or significantly changed its stance on employer policies and work rules, the makeup of bargaining […]

Print
pregnant

Liability for Employer Who Can’t ‘Have a Big Fat Pregnant Woman Working’ at His Restaurant

Employers must take care to create and implement neutral policies that don’t discriminate against women on the basis of pregnancy. Could you differentiate between a neutral policy and a policy that appears neutral but actually has a disparate impact on pregnant employees? And is a facially discriminatory policy against a pregnant woman—i.e., a policy that’s explicitly discriminatory—ever permissible?

Print