Tag: Immigration

Changes to rules regarding Canadian citizenship

by Arlin Sahinyan In a time when immigration rules and regulations in many jurisdictions are becoming more stringent, Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) has made changes to the citizenship guidelines making grants of Canadian citizenship more accessible to permanent residents of Canada. On June 19, Bill C-6 received Royal Assent resulting in immediate changes […]

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Suit filed over Trump’s phaseout of DACA: what employers should know

On September 5, President Donald Trump announced that the federal Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program will be phased out over the next six months. In response, 11 states and the District of Columbia have filed suit, alleging that the repeal of DACA violates the Equal Protection Clause of the U.S. Constitution and the […]

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New immigration bill called radical and not proemployment

The new immigration bill President Donald Trump touts as a way to “restore our competitive edge in the 21st century” calls for cutting immigration levels in half over a decade and creating a points-based system that favors highly educated and skilled immigrants with English ability over those with family in the United States. The bill […]

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Supreme Court’s action on ‘travel ban’ eases some employer concerns

by Tammy Binford and Holly Jones The U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to allow a limited form of President Donald Trump’s “travel ban” to take effect means people from the affected countries who work for employers in the United States are probably exempt from the ban. But the decision doesn’t clear up all questions for those […]

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Supreme Court ruling allows ‘travel ban’ Executive Order to take limited effect

On June 26, the last day of the current term, the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to determine whether the “travel ban” Executive Order’s (EO) focus on primarily Muslim countries violates the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution and whether the EO exceeds President Donald Trump’s authority granted by the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA). The […]

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A new era in immigration enforcement: what employers should know

by Lori T. Chesser Immigration law used to be something that few people thought about unless a friend or a relative was going through the system. Now, it’s a daily feature in our news and on social media. It’s likely that few of us have missed the news of President Donald Trump’s Executive Orders addressing […]

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Looking at strategic alternatives to H-1Bs during H-1B cap season

by Leigh Polk Cole Each year, employers looking to hire H-1B workers for hard-to-fill positions have to focus on preparing H-1B petitions for the April 1 H-1B lottery deadline. All you can do is hope for success in the lottery, which in recent years has led to H-1B approval in fewer than half the cases […]

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Walking the line between hiring only authorized workers and violating the discrimination laws

by Elaine Young Here are two situations in which you must avoid discrimination while fulfilling your obligation to hire only authorized workers.  Situation #1 ABC Resort is a beautiful, large new resort in the Utah mountains. Some of its managers heard about Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) raids a few years ago at other resorts […]

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What Supreme Court’s split decision on immigration reform means for employers

by Jacob M. Monty President Barack Obama’s executive actions on immigration were not upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court. Some of your employees are probably disappointed and unsure of how to move forward. The disappointment they are experiencing and displaying doesn’t mean they are undocumented workers, and you shouldn’t assume they are. Here are some […]

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New rule extends employment term for international STEM students

by Elaine Young The rules affecting how long international students in certain fields can work in the United States without changing their visa status will change on May 10. Currently, when international students in F-1 visa status graduate with a bachelor’s, master’s, or doctorate from a U.S. school, they can work for one year, in […]

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