Tag: unconscious bias

bias

Taking the Buzz Word Out of Bias

Bias continues to be a big topic in diversity and inclusion, but there is more to culture change and changing mind-set than taking a test on bias. While understanding bias is one key to diversity and inclusion practices and behaviors, it can be used as a buzz word, “trend or flavor of the month,” or […]

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Unconscious bias training helps fuel diversity efforts at industrial gas company

Despite a strategy to promote an inclusive culture in your organization, unconscious bias could be undermining your efforts. That is why some companies proactively address unconscious bias through training.  Take Praxair, Inc. This global industrial gas company worked with a third-party training vendor in Fall 2014 to create content for “Unconscious Bias to Conscious Inclusion,” […]

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When words used in a disciplinary report suggest implicit bias

by Barbara J. Koenig Implicit bias is an unconscious preference for or an aversion to a person or a group of people. In other words, we may have an attitude toward others or stereotype them without conscious knowledge of what we’re doing. If we act in accordance with our implicit bias, we may be discriminating […]

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Nobody’s perfect: Unconscious bias at work

by Lisa Chapman Royse Law Firm, PC Whether you work in an office or not, you should care about harassment in the workplace. It can be verbal or nonverbal, and the perpetrators often aren’t fully aware of the negative implications behind their words or actions. Whether we’re on the receiving end of the harassment or […]

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Wonder Woman and the fight against unconscious bias

Not only has the recently released Wonder Woman movie garnered mainly favorable reviews, but it has been highly successful at the box office, having made more than $200 million domestically in its first two weeks of release alone. From a purely movie industry insider perspective, the success of Wonder Woman is incredibly important to Warner […]

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Are decisions made for the reasons you think?

by Dinita L. James Employment laws prohibit intentional discrimination based on race, sex, or other protected characteristics as well as practices that have a discriminatory impact if they’re not supported by business necessity. Implicit or unconscious bias isn’t technically unlawful in the workplace if it doesn’t cause an unjustified adverse impact.  Yet a presidential candidate […]

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