HR Management & Compliance

Getting the C-Suite’s Attention: 7 Strategies

The first step in becoming a real HR strategist whose work is valued by the C-suite is, of course, to get their attention. Expert Jennifer McClure offers 7 strategies for transforming from HR leader to business leader.

McClure, president of Unbridled Talent LLC in West Chester, Ohio, offered her tips at SHRM’s Annual Conference and Exposition, held recently in Las Vegas. Here are her seven strategies:

1. Workforce Planning

In the old days, says McClure, we did head count planning. Today it’s workforce planning, which she defines as

The process that provides strategic direction to talent management activities to ensure an organization has the

  • right people in the
  • right place at the
  • right time and at the
  • right price

to execute its business strategy.


Want to make your hiring process simpler? Start on Wednesday, October 28, 2015, with a new interactive webinar—Supervisors and Managers as Recruiting Partners: Practical Strategies for Collaborating to Achieve Hiring Success. Learn More


What to do? First, identify critical roles and talent within the organization. This isn’t restricted to high level management, says McClure. This could be a salesperson who’d take customers or an admin person with important contacts.
Then, identify shortages of qualified talent to fill critical roles. Finally, determine whether to buy, build, or borrow.

  • With buying, says McClure, remember that top talent won’t move for a small increase or a lateral move.
  • Building usually means retraining or sending people to school.
  • Borrow means outsourcing in some way.

Also consider that not everyone has to work 9 to 5 in your office, says McClure. Consider part-timers, contractors, on/off every 6 months, and other options.

2. Attract and Recruit

Candidates have the upper hand these days, says McClure. Thanks to the Internet, they know what’s open, and they know a lot about employers.
And  the challenge, according to McClure, is that a projected shortfall of up to 18 million skilled workers will exist in advanced economies by 2020. (Talent Tensions Ahead: a CEO Briefing, McKinsey Global Institute, McKinsey and Company)

To succeed in attracting and recruiting, think like a jobseeker, says McClure:

  • 70% run a Google search
  • 55% check out the company website
  • 40% search ratings sites such as Glassdoor and Yelp
  • 40% check out the company’s Facebook page
  • 36% follow the company on Twitter
  • Only 4% of jobseekers start their job search with a specific company in mind (Talent Tensions Ahead: a CEO Briefing, McKinsey Global Institute, McKinsey and Company)

What are the top attraction drivers?

  • Base Pay/Salary
  • Job security
  • Career advancement opportunities
  • Learning and development opportunities
  • Challenging work
  • Organization’s reputation as a good employer
  • Vacation/Paid time off

Stay aware of the following, suggests McClure:

  • What’s the cost of unfilled jobs?
  • What’s the cost of top talent leaving?

Top talent is not available for long; they won’t wait for a long process. So, don’t let your hiring managers say “I want to see a few more” if they’ve seen a top prospect.


Recruit faster and better. Join us Wednesday, October 28, 2015, for a new interactive webinar, Supervisors and Managers as Recruiting Partners: Practical Strategies for Collaborating to Achieve Hiring Success. Earn 1 hour in HRCI Recertification Credit and 1 hour in SHRM Professional Development Credit. Register Now


3. Retain Key Employees

Do you know who your key employees are? asks McClure. And are you treating them for retention?

How many employees are actively looking for work?

Who's Actively Looking?

(Source; LinkedIn® Talent trends Survey 2014)

One study found that 42% of employees would stay with their current companies for the prospect of job advancement or promotion, McClure says.

Also, benefits matter. The table below clearly shows that those who are satisfied with their benefits are much more likely to be satisfied with their jobs as well.

 

Satisfied with benefits

Very dissatisfied with benefits

I am very satisfied with my job

70%

23%

I have no plans to leave my current employer

59%

38%

(Source: Employer Benefit Trends—Met Life)

In tomorrow’s Advisor, the rest of McClure’s 7 tips, plus an introduction to an interactive webinar, Supervisors and Managers as Recruiting Partners: Practical Strategies for Collaborating to Achieve Hiring Success.