Category: Employment Law

Employment law is the bread and butter of the HR Daily Advisor. Check out articles from this topic to see what the latest rules and regulations are, as well as track important employment law cases.

What Is the True Cost of Expanded EEO-1 Reporting?

After several months of uncertainty, we now know that employers will be required to submit Component 2 data (i.e., employee wage and hour data) to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) by September 30, 2019. Not only that, but they will be required to submit 2017 and 2018 Component 2 data, which means 2 years […]

Supreme Court Poised to Make Its Mark On Employment Law

Halfway through the current administration, it’s unlikely there will be much significant employment legislation passed between now and the next election. With the Democrats controlling the House of Representatives, it doesn’t really matter what laws the president proposes and the Senate passes. There won’t be any consensus on major legislative policy initiatives.

What Gummy Vitamins Can Teach HR Pros About Workplace Policies

As I stared at the half-full 200-count bottle of gummy vitamins sitting in front of my computer monitor, I read a recent Time Magazine article that examined whether the supplements actually “work.” Unfortunately, the short answer is “no.” Fortunately, I didn’t let that stop me from figuring out how the vitamins can provide us with […]

Free Speech in the Workplace

There’s no question that many Americans believe that we are more politically divided than ever, and the tension from that divide is being felt in the workplace. In a 2018 study by Randstad US, 43% of survey respondents reported that they have at least one work colleague whose political views do not align with their […]

Boss, You Can’t Say That—It’s Retaliation”

When a federal jury in a retaliation case hands a $1.5 million verdict to a Phoenix police sergeant, the case gets my attention. The April 10, 2019, verdict made headlines in the Arizona Republic, where the lawyer for Sergeant Jeffrey Green extolled the “big and worthwhile victory.”

Supreme Court

New SCOTUS Proemployee Ruling Not a Big Change for Employers

A new ruling from the U.S. Supreme Court shows why it’s important for employers and their attorneys to examine whether employees making discrimination claims have exhausted their administrative remedies before going to court. And if an employee claiming discrimination hasn’t done so, it’s up to the employer to promptly raise an objection.

A Careful Balance: Managing Political Activity and Speech at Work

HR professionals have the responsibility to enforce workplace rules, promote cooperation, insist on civility and respect, and—most of all—remind folks they are on one team, at least in the workplace. Meanwhile, another election season is imminent. How do you keep people working productively when those very divisive discussions are happening at work?

Owner’s Alleged Harassment is Tough Pill for Pharmacy to Swallow

Individuals who claim to have experienced sexual harassment typically file claims under Title VII and any state-specific acts that might apply such as the Illinois Human Rights Act (IHRA). But those aren’t the only potential legal claims an individual can level against an employer (or former employer). In some instances, the alleged conduct supporting a […]