Tag: discrimination

‘Unreasonable’ Accommodation Request Foils Nurse’s ADA Claims

A nurse’s inability to perform essential job functions, either with or without reasonable accommodations, prevented her disability discrimination claim from advancing to a jury trial and warranted summary judgment by the U.S. District Court for the District of Minnesota in Attiogbe-Tay v. SE Rolling Hills LLC, No. 12-1109 (D. Minn. Nov. 7, 2013). Comfort Attiogbe-Tay, […]

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Employees Must Prove Disability in Spite of Lower ADAAA Bar

While the ADA Amendments Act made it easier for employees to show that they have a disability, it did not eliminate the requirement, the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled in Neely v. PSEG Texas, No. 12-51074 (5th Cir. Nov. 6, 2013). Facts of the Case Jeffrey Neely worked as a control-room operator […]

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Employer’s Injured-player Analogy Backfires in ADA Suit

A university’s likening of a disabled professor to a baseball player with a career-ending injury did not persuade a judge to dismiss the professor’s disability discrimination allegations. On the contrary, it showed that the employer may have fired the professor because of his disability, a federal judge said in Matland v. Loyola University of Chicago, No. […]

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Toys “R” Us Will Pay $35K for Requiring Deaf Applicant to Provide Own Interpreter

Retailer Toys “R” Us will pay $35,000 to settle allegations that it required a deaf applicant to provide her own interpreter for a job interview  according to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. EEOC filed suit earlier this year on behalf of Shakirra Thomas, alleging multiple Americans with Disabilities Act violations. According to the commission, Thomas […]

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Wal-Mart Pharmacy Sued over Refusal to Hire Rehabilitated Addicts

Wal-Mart is facing a class action lawsuit alleging that its refusal to hire pharmacists whose licenses have been suspended violates the Americans with Disabilities Act. Wal-Mart recently implemented a policy of firing and refusing to hire pharmacy employees who have any history of adverse action against their licenses by a state pharmacy board, the suit […]

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No Return-to-Work Form, No Guarantee Job Will Be Waiting

An employee’s refusal to provide acceptable return-to-work documentation after a medical leave of absence may be viewed as a voluntary resignation, even if that individual has a disability as defined under the Americans with Disabilities Act. This assertion helped the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals affirm a lower federal court’s summary judgment in favor […]

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Plaintiff’s Attorney Fined for Withholding Evidence in ADA Suit

An employee’s attorney must pay $5,000 for omitting important information in an Americans with Disabilities Act lawsuit, the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled. In Kempter v. Michigan Bell Telephone Co. , No. 13-1036 (6th Cir. Aug. 26, 2013), the plaintiff’s attorney failed to mention that that his client, Cathie Kempter, had been permanently restricted […]

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No more human rights forum shopping?

By Lindsey Taylor A few weeks ago, we reported on the recent decision in Baker v. Navistar Canada Inc., which confirmed that unionized employees aren’t able to bring employment claims to court. Rather, these claims must be brought within the framework of the special legal relationship between the union and the employer, either by way […]

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Sex, religion, and retaliation

by Mark I. Schickman I keep waiting for the day that employment discrimination claims disappear. We spend a ton of time training employees to prevent and avoid discriminatory conduct, and the proper behavior is pretty intuitive. So, logically, employment discrimination should have been eradicated, like polio and smallpox. It would be terrible for my business […]

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Title VII Standard for Retaliation Claims Gets Scaled Back by Supreme Court

Noting that the increasing number of employee retaliation claims in employment discrimination cases calls for the proper interpretation and implementation of statutory language, the U.S. Supreme Court on June 24 issued a 5-4 ruling that will likely make it easier for employers to fend off such claims. In University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center v. […]

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