Tag: Payroll Deductions

New York City’s ‘Fair Workweek’ laws set to take effect

by Angelo D. Catalano Coughlin & Gerhart, LLP New York City fast-food and retail employers need to be ready for the city’s package of five new “Fair Workweek” laws when they go into effect on November 26. Following is a summary outlining the basics of the new laws. Fast-food workers No “clopening.” Fast-food employers are […]

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Ask the Expert: Deductions from Final Paycheck for Loan, Child Support

Here are two interesting questions related to deductions from final paychecks of employees.  Both are interesting scenarios and serve as reminders to employers that their state laws should be referenced before making decisions about deductions from pay. Question 1:   I have question about the last paycheck that I am paying to our employee. Employee has […]

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Big changes to Kansas Wage Payment Act take effect July 1

by Boyd Byers and Lindsey Smith Significant revisions to the Kansas Wage Payment Act (KWPA) go into effect July 1, changes that give employers more latitude to make payroll deductions to recoup overpayments, loans, and property provided to employees. Under old law, employers could withhold wages only in limited circumstances, such as (1) when specifically […]

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Managing Employee Health Insurance Premiums under Revised FMLA Regulations

When an employee takes unpaid Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) leave, how do you legally manage his share of premiums for group health care coverage under the new FMLA regulations? What are the potential liabilities, and how can you avoid them? What are an employer’s rights? The answers to those questions are provided below. […]

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Payroll Deductions That Don’t Affect Employees’ Exempt Status

by Gary Fealk Workers who qualify as executive, administrative, or professional employees may be exempt from the overtime requirements of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) if they are paid on a salaried basis or not less than $455 per week. However, if an employee’s basis of compensation isn’t “salaried,” the exemption will be lost. […]

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