Category: Strategic HR

caregiving

Supporting Caregivers in the Workplace is a Good Investment, Says Report

Employers need to be aware of the potential pay-offs for offering benefits and services that make caregiving an easier burden for employees to bear, says a new report from Northeast Business Group on Health (NEBGH). The report, “The Caregiving Landscape: Challenges and Opportunities for Employers,” says that maximizing productivity, reducing future employee healthcare costs, and […]

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Severance

Guide to Severance Reveals Positive Changes in Payout, Eligibility, and Benefits

RiseSmart, a provider of contemporary career transition services, has released its 2017 Guide to Severance and Workforce Transition. The Guide helps organizations ensure their severance policies are competitive and comprehensive. Containing rich data from a survey of U.S. businesses with at least 500 employees, the Guide gives organizations an easy way to benchmark their severance […]

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technology

New Report Finds HR Must Adapt to Survive New Employment Models

A new report, released by Henley Business School and Oxford Strategic Consulting (OSC), examined global human capital challenges facing today’s leading organizations and how business leaders can deliver the differentiating strategic capabilities (DiSCs) needed to achieve outstanding strategic success.

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Gamification

How are Companies Achieving Success with Gamification?

Gamification is about driving motivation, with the hope of engrossing us and mesmerizing us just as games do. In business, gamification isn’t about games developed for businesses, but the prudently calculated use of prevailing game design methods (design, action, fun, and competition) and procedures (leaderboards, points, and badges) to achieve a business outcome.

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To Solve Millennial Misconceptions, Work Together at All Levels of the Organization

There is so much written about Millennials and their supposed character traits: a sense of entitlement (e.g., expecting a promotion without “paying their dues”), a questionable work ethic (e.g., coming in late and leaving early), and a lack of loyalty (i.e., being job hoppers). Not all organizations are actually having these experiences with Millennial employees. However, I suspect that some hiring managers have a misconception about Millennials based on what they are reading versus actually experiencing it for themselves.

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coaching

Why Employee Coaching May Be Your Best Strategy

In the new Coaching Employees For High Performance report, it was found that 71% of employees who took advantage of learning opportunities were more motivated. What’s even more encouraging, 64% felt more equipped to do their job, 55% felt empowered, and 48% felt ready to take on more responsibility. As you can see, the power of employee coaching goes far beyond learning something new. Here are more real benefits to this training trend.

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Happy workers

How Employee Happiness Increases Client Retention

Organizations are always looking for ways to retain their client base; after all, they are one of the main drivers of profit and business growth. While many businesses hold tight to traditional customer relations practices, many overlook the secret weapon right under their own roof – their current employees. This idea is simple but powerful: By keeping employees happy, business leaders can keep their client base happy.

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culture

Company Culture’s Impact on Constructive Performance Measurement

Human Resource (HR) professionals are often put in situations where they are required to balance the needs and wants of employees as well as those of the overall company. While the needs of a company are important, employees are the key reason as to why companies are successful, which means their ability to deliver results while being happy in their role is the ultimate goal.

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march madness

March Madness Matters in an Employee-Centric World

Employee engagement is a hot topic today. And understandably so: Gallup estimates employee disengagement costs the U.S. $450 billion to $550 billion annually. It’s a fairly basic concept, and we all get it: Engaged employees are good for business—and perhaps most compellingly, bottom lines.

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