Tag: employer

What Gummy Vitamins Can Teach HR Pros About Workplace Policies

As I stared at the half-full 200-count bottle of gummy vitamins sitting in front of my computer monitor, I read a recent Time Magazine article that examined whether the supplements actually “work.” Unfortunately, the short answer is “no.” Fortunately, I didn’t let that stop me from figuring out how the vitamins can provide us with […]

Supreme Court

New SCOTUS Proemployee Ruling Not a Big Change for Employers

A new ruling from the U.S. Supreme Court shows why it’s important for employers and their attorneys to examine whether employees making discrimination claims have exhausted their administrative remedies before going to court. And if an employee claiming discrimination hasn’t done so, it’s up to the employer to promptly raise an objection.

Should You Offer Relocation Assistance?

Relocation assistance is something that not all employers offer but could be worthwhile to consider. Some employers think that the expense is too great to be justified, while others think that it opens many doors and allows them access to candidates they never would have otherwise found.

NY Fast-Food Industry’s ‘No-Poaching’ Agreements in the Cross-hairs

New York’s fast-food employers remain in the line of fire. First came the higher minimum wage laws. Next came proposed legislation that mirrors New York City’s “Fair Work Week” laws on “predictable scheduling” and attempts to end the “tip credit.” Now, new Attorney General Barbara D. Underwood recently joined a coalition of other states’ attorneys […]

What Are Posthire Background Checks?

Most employers perform some form of background screening on prospective employees. Often, this is conducted as a condition of the job offer. The candidate proceeds through the hiring process and is made a conditional offer, and the offer proceeds if nothing negative is discovered through the screening process.

Can You Fire an Employee over Social Media Posts?

Can an employer fire employees solely over what they’ve posted on social media? Does the answer change, depending on whether the post was made from a work or personal device? Does it matter whether the person’s social media account is connected to the employer in some way?