Tag: rules

SECURE

What Is the SECURE Act?

If your organization offers any type of retirement benefit, perhaps you’re already familiar with the Setting Every Community Up for Retirement Enhancement (SECURE) Act of 2019. The majority of this legislation went into effect at the beginning of 2020 and made some interesting changes to various retirement plan contribution and withdrawal rules.

religious

Impact of Supreme Court’s Two Rulings for Religious Employers

Last month, the U.S. Supreme Court decided two cases, both by 7-2 votes, involving religion’s impact on employment. First, the Court clarified the applicability of the ministerial exemption for religious schools and organizations from the federal antidiscrimination laws.

leader

Being Warm and Demanding Makes a Good Leader and a Good Culture

Often, what makes leaders and workplace cultures great is that they are warm and demanding. The best organizations function when their leaders, HR team, internal brand, and culture all match their external brand. Getting that balance right, however, can be challenging. I recently discussed the issue with an expert with many years in the field […]

training

Training for COVID-19

The rapid spread of COVID-19 has led to unprecedented business disruption around the world. The fast pace and huge scale of changes to everyday personal lives and work lives are a recipe for chaos if not properly managed. An effective training department can be critical to stemming such chaos. Here, we talk about key elements […]

The Dangers of Unsolicited Assistance

Have you ever found yourself in a situation when you’re getting more offers of help than you really want or need? That is a common experience for many employees. Not only does unsolicited help waste both the offeror’s and the offeree’s time, but it can also lead to bad blood on both ends.

conduct

How to Take Advantage of OSHA’s ‘Employee Misconduct’ Defense

Many times, when employers receive an Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) citation—if not most times—they claim it wasn’t their fault, but rather the employee did something stupid. OSHA recognizes such a defense, called the “employee misconduct” defense. It is an affirmative defense, meaning the employer has the burden of proof in establishing the misconduct.