Tag: Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964

Circuit

Showing Favoritism to Paramour Isn’t Unlawful Sex Bias Under Title VII

Although supervisory favoritism toward a paramour may be unfair and ill-advised, it isn’t illegal sex discrimination under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, according to the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals (whose rulings apply to all Washington employers). Facts William Maner worked in a medical research laboratory operated by Dignity Health […]

Carefully Handling Adverse Action Thwarts Employee’s Retaliation Claim

Retaliation claims are the most frequently alleged basis for violations of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the most common finding of wrongdoing, according to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). Often, the underlying discrimination allegations will be dismissed, but a court will determine retaliation occurred.

What Employees Must Show to Prove Title VII Claims Against Federal Employers

Claims filed under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 require employees to demonstrate several specific elements to prove race discrimination, retaliation, hostile work environment, or constructive discharge by a federal employer. To be successful, they must show an adverse employment action, intolerable working conditions, or harassment affecting their terms, conditions, or privileges […]

No Title VII Protection So Far for People “Perceived to Be” Black

Despite being the son of white Irish parents, British theater director Anthony Ekundayo Lennon appears to be a mixed-race man because of his “high cheekbones” and “curly hair.” He drew media attention recently when he claimed that as an actor, he found it easier to pursue nonwhite parts. He also changed his middle name from […]

Oscars Delve into Legal Territory with Two Words: Inclusion Rider

At the end of her Oscars acceptance speech for Best Actress this year, Frances McDormand, after having spoken about equality, concluded with the following statement: “I have two words to leave with you tonight, ladies and gentlemen: inclusion rider.” And with that, McDormand was done and making her way off stage, leaving the audience and […]

Can They Do That? Firing Employees for Off-Duty Conduct

by T. Harold Pinkley Participating in last year’s Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia—an event that involved several groups usually identified as the “alt-right,” along with groups protesting the marchers—has proven to have unforeseen and unintended consequences, including job loss, for some of the people involved. This article examines how you can or should […]

transgender

DOJ Reverses Course on Title VII Protections for Transgender Persons

  On October 4, 2017, U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions issued a memorandum announcing the U.S. Justice Department’s (DOJ) new stance that transgender employees aren’t protected from discrimination under federal law. The announcement reflects a reversal from the Obama administration’s interpretation of the law and runs counter to federal court decisions and other federal agencies’ […]

What EEOC’s recent lawsuit over parental leave means for employers

by Jessica A.H. Howell The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) is a federal agency that administers and enforces civil rights laws when individuals claim workplace discrimination. Recently, the EEOC filed suit against a cosmetics company for implementing and administering parental leave benefits in a discriminatory manner based on sex. The lawsuit is the first of […]

Oklahoma jury awards transgender worker $1.165 million in bias suit

by Charlie Plumb The courts, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ), and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) hold differing views on whether Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits employment discrimination based on sexual orientation or sexual identity. Nevertheless, on November 20, an Oklahoma City federal court jury awarded a transgender […]

LGBT

Deciphering the feds’ changing position on LGBT employment protections under Title VII

by Molly DiBianca In a memo issued on October 4, 2017, U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions formally declared that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 does not prohibit discrimination based on transgender status. The memo directly conflicts with the position of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), which has long argued that […]