Tag: Ontario Human Rights Tribunal

Union blog’s sexist comments about manager constitutionally protected, not discriminatory, says court

by Nicole Singh Canadian tribunals have consistently ruled that communications by employees on social media can be viewed as an extension of the workplace. Improper communication on such platforms can therefore be considered a form of workplace discrimination under Canadian human rights laws. Discipline or termination can sometimes be appropriate. However, in the decision Taylor-Baptiste […]

Print

Managing the message in the hiring process in Canada: human rights risks

By Marc Rodrigue Hiring a new employee can be a lengthy process, fraught with complex evaluations of skills, qualifications, and other attributes. The whole process must of course comply with applicable provincial and federal antidiscrimination laws. What people say during the process may provide evidence that a hiring decision is discriminatory. Where multiple people are […]

Print

A Shaved Head and Microwave Food Policy — Human Rights Violations?

By Sara Parchello It’s amazing the issues that pop up in front of human rights tribunals across Canada. Recently, the Manitoba Human Rights Commission was asked whether it is discriminatory to fire an employee for shaving her head. On an equally interesting level, the Ontario Human Rights Tribunal was asked whether it is discriminatory to […]

Print

Do Age-Based Early Retirement Programs Violate Human Rights Code?

By Ralph Nero and Ida Martin Are pension plans that provide age-based early retirement programs discriminatory? In a decision that may be important across Canada, the Ontario Human Rights Tribunal has recently answered no. In Kovacs v. Arcelor Mittal Montreal, Kovacs argued that he had been discriminated against on the basis of his age by […]

Print