HR Management & Compliance

Hot List: Bestselling “Industries and Professions” books on Amazon.com

Amazon.com updates its list of the bestselling books every hour. Here is a snapshot of what is hot right now, this Monday morning, February 22, in the “Industries and Professions” section of the “Business and Investing” category.

1. Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us by Daniel H. Pink. The author of A Whole New Mind: Why Right-Brainers Will Rule the Future says the secret to high performance and satisfaction in today’s world is the deeply human need to direct our own lives, to learn and create new things, and to do better by ourselves and our world.

2. The Five Dysfunctions of a Team: A Leadership Fable by Patrick Lencioni. The author targets group behavior in the final entry of his trilogy of corporate fables. When the instructional tale is over, Lencioni discusses the “five dysfunctions” (absence of trust, fear of conflict, lack of commitment, avoidance of accountability, and inattention to results) and provides a questionnaire for readers to use in evaluating their own teams and specifics to help them understand and overcome these common shortcomings.

3. Inbound Marketing: Get Found Using Google, Social Media, and Blogs (The New Rules of Social Media) by Brian Halligan, Dharmesh Shah, and David Meerman Scott. Traditional “outbound” marketing methods like cold-calling, email blasts, advertising, and direct mail are increasingly less effective. People are getting better at blocking these interruptions out using Caller ID, spam protection, TiVo, etc. People are now increasingly turning to Google, social media, and blogs to find products and services. Inbound Marketing helps you take advantage of this change by showing you how to get found by customers online.

4. Crush It!: Why NOW Is the Time to Cash In on Your Passion by Gary Vaynerchuk. Vaynerchuk took over his father’s local liquor store, building it from a $4 million business to a $50 million one, created the wine-tasting blog Wine Library TV, and discovered the power of the Internet for driving sales. This book shares his experience and step-by-step advice for using Twitter, Facebook, etc., and suggestions for monetizing an online persona, reiterating that the Internet makes it possible for anyone to make serious cash by turning what they love most into their personal brand.

5. Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap… and Others Don’t by Jim Collins. The author of Built to Last: Successful Habits of Visionary Companies, Collins concludes that it is possible for a good company to become a great company, but finds there are no silver bullets. Collins and his team of researchers began their quest by sorting through a list of 1,435 companies, looking for those that made substantial improvements in their performance over time. They finally settled on 11–including Fannie Mae, Gillette, Walgreens, and Wells Fargo–and discovered common traits that challenged many of the conventional notions of corporate success.

6. Food Inc.: A Participant Guide: How Industrial Food is Making Us Sicker, Fatter, and Poorer-And What You Can Do About It edited by Karl Weber. A companion to the documentary of the same name, this book contains a series of challenging essays by leading experts and thinkers.

7. The New Rules of Marketing and PR: How to Use Social Media, Blogs, News Releases, Online Video, and Viral Marketing to Reach Buyers Directly, 2nd Edition by David Meerman Scott. This book shows you how to leverage the potential that Web-based communication offers your business, allowing you to speak directly to customers and buyers, establishing a personal link with the people who make your business work.

8. Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In by Bruce M. Patton, William L. Ury, and Roger Fisher. A simple and straightforward five-step system for how to behave in negotiations.

9. The Ascent of Money: A Financial History of the World by Niall Ferguson. Ferguson reveals financial history as the essential backstory behind all history, arguing that the evolution of credit and debt was as important as any technological innovation in the rise of civilization.

10. Lords of Finance: The Bankers Who Broke the World by Liaquat Ahamed. It is commonly believed that the Great Depression that began in 1929 resulted from a confluence of events beyond any one person’s or government’s control.  Ahamed argues that it was the decisions made by a small number of central bankers that were the primary cause of that economic meltdown, the effects of which set the stage for World War II and reverberated for decades.