Tag: EEOC

ADA

Taking a Load Off: EEOC Cracks Down on Unlawful Accommodation Policies

A Texas-based employer has agreed to pay $2.65 million to settle a lawsuit in which the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) claimed it violated federal discrimination laws by refusing to accommodate food servers with disabilities. You can avoid a similar outcome by implementing reasonable accommodation procedures.

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HR Pro Caught in Loyalty Dilemma Sues for Retaliation

Under normal circumstances, the HR department represents the interests of the company in dealing with employee complaints, including external inquiries such as Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) charges and lawsuits. HR investigates complaints, advises management, tries to resolve the complaints internally, and, if that isn’t successful, responds to external governmental and legal inquiries.

What Is the True Cost of Expanded EEO-1 Reporting?

After several months of uncertainty, we now know that employers will be required to submit Component 2 data (i.e., employee wage and hour data) to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) by September 30, 2019. Not only that, but they will be required to submit 2017 and 2018 Component 2 data, which means 2 years […]

Boss, You Can’t Say That—It’s Retaliation

When a federal jury in a retaliation case hands a $1.5 million verdict to a Phoenix police sergeant, the case gets my attention. The April 10, 2019, verdict made headlines in the Arizona Republic, where the lawyer for Sergeant Jeffrey Green extolled the “big and worthwhile victory.”

shame

Common Examples of Gender Bias in the Workplace

In a previous post, we discussed a recent Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) case regarding a blatant form of gender discrimination in which a male softball coach at a Baltimore school was replaced—despite satisfactory performance—after being told that the school had “a preference for female leadership.”

discrimination

EEOC Settles Claim in Favor of Male Softball Coach

Gender discrimination has a long, dark history in the United States. For centuries, the workplace—and society in general—has been dominated by men, and only relatively recently have women become almost on par with men in terms of compensation and advancement opportunities.