Tag: Employee Retention

Money Doesn’t Buy Happiness, but Maybe Volunteering Does

According to a recent study, 27% of U.S. travelers are planning to volunteer on a trip this year. Volunteerism, thankfully, is becoming a stronger trend, and in the case of potential employees in the Millennial generation, who, as a group, highly value volunteerism, it’s important to recognize this need in a benefits program. In fact, companies […]

CFOs Asked to be Corporate Strategists as Technology Increases Impact

Over the last few posts Managing Director of Stanton Chase, Paul Herrerias, has joined us to discuss some best practices for recruiting chief financial officers (CFOs) and how you can retain this new hire through great onboarding. In this final installment, Herrerias will discuss some of the issues that are redefining the role of the […]

Can You Predict Which Employee Is Going to Quit?

Now more than ever, companies are struggling with attrition on a massive scale. U.S. job turnover reached more than 19% towards the end of 2018. And, additional reports are showing more than half of U.S. employees plan to look for new jobs before the end of this year.

Expert Tips for Recruiting and Retaining Chief Financial Officers

In a tight labor market, recruiting top talent is tough, and even more so when you’re looking to recruit executive roles. But fear not, we’ve got an expert who is sharing some tips to help you recruit and retain a Chief Financial Officer (CFO).

Information Overload: Employee Communications in Crisis

Let’s face it: We’re all on information overload. The amount of content we are consuming on a minute-by-minute basis in the blurred lines between our personal and professional lives has exploded in this digital economy.

Employee Experience Must Focus on the ‘Human’ Aspect, Says Expert

Candidate experience has been a popular focus for many employers, as this experience can make or break an employer’s chance at hiring top talent. However, once you’ve got the candidate in the door, you don’t want to risk losing them because your company has a poor culture or offers a terrible employee experience.