Tag: employment

If You Don’t Have Anything Nice to Say … Definitely Don’t Tweet It!

The old adage—“If you don’t have anything nice to say, don’t say anything at all”—definitely rings true for social media, as it would in the real world. However, why is it that people still haven’t grasped this concept? With more and more employers screening social media, you would think current and prospective employees would be […]

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We Need a Recruit, STAT

What if you need someone to fill a position immediately? The instinct is to rush and get whomever you can as fast as you can. But rushing the process can have damaging results.

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Keep Employees with Stay Interviews

Yesterday we learned about how to use stay interviews to keep employees from leaving. Today we present more on that topic, including how to make change with feedback and to allow changes to permeate your corporate culture.

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Our Intern is Working Out; Let’s Keep Her

In Yesterday’s Advisor we explored six tests for determining whether an intern can be unpaid. Today we’ll see how internships lead to regular employment, as well as look at an internship checklist.

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Avoid the Affinity Group Danger Zone

Employers of all sizes have generously supported so-called affinity groups for years as a natural extension of workplace diversity, culture, and inclusion efforts. Also known as networking, advocacy, diversity, focus or support groups, it’s estimated that nearly 90% of Fortune 500 companies have them. Their aim was, innocently enough, to facilitate networking and common interest […]

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A $15 California Minimum Wage?

Most California employers will see the state’s minimum wage reach $15 an hour by 2022 if reports of a deal in the state legislature materialize as expected. Some businesses and industries may be impacted more than others—how will the proposed wage increases affect your company?

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Misclassification Remedies: Should You Consider VCSP?

In recent years, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has made a big push to get employers to properly classify employees—they’ve stepped up their audits of organizations who may have improperly classified workers as independent contractors (workers who should have been classified as employees all along).

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